From the Impact100 DC president

Impact100 was founded by Wendy Steele in 2001 with the goal of empowering women to create significant change within their communities. The efficacy of her simple goal – 100 women donating $1,000 and awarding a transformational $100,000 grant to a worthy community nonprofit organization – has resulted in over 54 chapters worldwide.

Those of us who discussed founding an Impact100 DC were very taken with that simple concept. And while starting up any nonprofit organization is a challenge, our way has been paved by scores of women who have assumed leadership roles in communities across the country. We have relied on many of them to share with us their advice for a successful start-up and we have looked to best practices across numerous organizations in developing all aspects of ours.

The real beauty of the model, though, is that it is local. We are working hard to form a community of women that reflects – and therefore understands – the huge complexities of need in our Washington, DC metropolitan area. Our Impact will look quite different from that of Northwest Florida, or Philadelphia, or Traverse City – all chapters on whom we have relied for wisdom and advice.

It seems to me that in this unprecedented, hugely challenging, isolating time, we need to find a greater, broader sense of what it means to be a community. There is huge power there, and we hope you will help us find and take advantage of it.

The Impact100 Model

The Impact100 model is readily available to all communities who wish to implement it. The model is designed to empower women to see themselves as philanthropists and overcome the barriers women have historically faced in this arena. The model is designed for transformational grant-making within local communities, with a minimum grant size of $100,000.

At Least 100 Women
Come Together

Each Woman
Donates $1,000

$100,000
is donated to a
Local Charity

Focus Areas

We provide non-profit organizations with grants in increments of at least $100,000 across five broad Focus Areas:

Arts & Culture

Education

Family

Health & Wellness

Environment

Impact100 DC accepts applications from nonprofits in the District of Columbia, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Fairfax, and Arlington Counties, and the cities of Alexandria, Fairfax, and Falls Church. All 501(c)(3) nonprofits, except those organizations whose primary purpose and use of grant funds is for religious or political activities, are eligible to apply.

How it Works
  • Impact100 DC operates on a yearly cycle, beginning with Membership Recruitment. After the membership recruitment period ends, Impact DC announces the size of the grant and nonprofits are invited to submit Letters of Intent in one of the five focus areas. You will be notified by email if you are chosen to submit a full grant proposal. Impact DC members volunteer to serve on a grant committee to study proposals, perform site visits, and select the strongest applicant. Finalists from each of the focus areas present their projects at the Annual Meeting of Impact100 DC. The entire membership of Impact DC votes to select the winner(s). SEE TIMELINE
  • The annual $1,000 donation of each Impact100 DC member goes exclusively to funding the grants. We rely on “Member Plus” 110% contributions as well as Friends of Impact100 DC to pay for operating costs.
  • Membership is open to all women over the age of 21 and renewable annually.
  • Impact100 is inclusive and egalitarian. Each member casts one vote.
  • Impact100 DC is an all-volunteer organization. We rely exclusively on the expertise, time and talent of our members. That said, members may do as much or as little as time and circumstance allow. Members can be directly involved in the grant review process, learning more about area needs and the nonprofits working to address them. They can serve on a committee and be directly involved in the myriad operational aspects of Impact. Or, they can simply cast their vote at the annual meeting.

Executive Board

Ann Vaughn
President
Ann Vaughn began teaching music at Holton-Arms School, an independent school for girls in Bethesda, Maryland, in 1992. During her tenure there, she taught general and choral music to girls in grades 3 though 8. As Chair of the Music...
Ann Vaughn
President

Ann Vaughn began teaching music at Holton-Arms School, an independent school for girls in Bethesda, Maryland, in 1992. During her tenure there, she taught general and choral music to girls in grades 3 though 8. As Chair of the Music Department, she supervised music faculty in all three school divisions. She led curricular review and development for the department, as well as departmental participation in school-wide strategic initiatives. Ms Vaughn served for three years on the Holton-Arms Board of Trustees as the Faculty Trustee.

 

Ms Vaughn was active throughout her career in the Maryland Music Educators Association, the State’s professional association for music teachers, serving as President from 2003-2005. She presented over the years at state, regional and national music conferences on a wide range of topics in general and choral music education. Of particular interest throughout her career was global music education. She travelled twice to Ghana to study traditional music in a small village in the Volta region, and she became known as a area resource for incorporating Ghanaian music into school programs. She was a strong advocate for Holton’s now well-established Global Education Program and served as a trip leader to Senegal for the first group of Upper School students to participate in the Junior Journeys program.

 

During her last several years of teaching, Ms Vaughn became immersed in community outreach efforts on behalf of the School. She was instrumental in establishing a partnership around arts education projects with the Washington School for Girls, a Catholic school for girls in Anacostia. She continued to volunteer as a music teacher at WSG after her retirement from Holton and tutored at-risk students through a program to help with mastery of basic reading skills. 

 

Ms Vaughn received a B.A. In English from Ohio Wesleyan University and earned her Master of Music degree from the Catholic University of America.

“For me the most compelling idea in the Impact 100 model is that individual women – who join together, who pool intellectual and financial resources, and who educate themselves about the greatest unmet needs and inequities in their community – can become significant agents of change.”

Sharon Dennis
Secretary
Ms. Dennis began her career in social justice and child advocacy when, as a recent college graduate, she joined the National Black Child Development Institute, which focused on improving conditions for Black children in the areas of education, child welfare,...
Sharon Dennis
Secretary

Ms. Dennis began her career in social justice and child advocacy when, as a recent college graduate, she joined the National Black Child Development Institute, which focused on improving conditions for Black children in the areas of education, child welfare, and health.  There, she helped develop a program to mobilize the community in five pilot cities to work one-on-one with at-risk youth to increase their chances of success in school and beyond.  Following law school, Ms. Dennis worked as a staff attorney for the National Audubon Society, where she built a powerful coalition that brought social justice groups to lobby alongside the environmental community on a range of issues.  While stepping away from the law to raise two daughters, she volunteered as a community leader in her children’s California school district, where she was active in fundraising and promoting student achievement, as well as outreach to new immigrant communities.  Upon her return to DC in 2009, Ms. Dennis received specialized student advocacy training from the Took Cowell Institute for At-Risk Youth at the U.D.C. David A. Clarke School of Law.  She went on to co-found and direct a DC-based nonprofit that paired volunteer mentors to work individually with homeless middle school-aged youth.  There she was responsible for all facets of board development, community outreach, program administration, and fundraising.  Ms. Dennis received a B.A. in Politics from Mount Holyoke College, and a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

After years of providing direct services through a number of nonprofits in DC, I’m drawn to the idea of creating a single transformational grant that can change an organization – and the people it serves.”

Betty Dziura
Treasurer
Betty currently serves as Vice President-Controller at Hines, a global real estate investment, development and management firm.  Over the past 25 years, she has gained experience in all aspects of real estate accounting and financial reporting for office, apartment, condominium,...
Betty Dziura
Treasurer

Betty currently serves as Vice President-Controller at Hines, a global real estate investment, development and management firm.  Over the past 25 years, she has gained experience in all aspects of real estate accounting and financial reporting for office, apartment, condominium, and multi-use developments.

Since 2012, Betty has had responsibility for the Hines East Region Accounting Group, comprised of over 50 real estate accounting professionals in Boston, New York and D.C.  In this role she provides oversight and supervision of 9 controllers responsible for the financial management and reporting for projects in the region. Betty also oversees compliance with internal controls at Hines and coordinates with external audit and tax firms to ensure timely completion of annual audit reports and periodic tax filings.

Betty received her B.A. in Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.